7 Evaluation Subjects for Lecturers of College Entrepreneurs

by Wayne Liew

in Entrepreneurship

If you are a college entrepreneur, you definitely have to agree with me that balancing studies, assignments and classes with the day to day running of your own business operations is extremely difficult.

Lecturers play a somewhat important role in nurturing college entrepreneurs. They can also be the determining factor of whether fellow college entrepreneurs can maintain their sense of innovation and entrepreneurial spirit without having to become a college dropout.

With that, I now list the 7 evaluation subjects that lecturers must at least achieve a pass before they can educate the brilliant entrepreneurial minds, with some already having their own venture while in college.


Entrepreneurial Mindset

There is nothing better for a college entrepreneur than having a lecturer that enjoys entrepreneurship and embraces innovation in his or her classes. Entrepreneurial lecturers will always seek for a better teaching solution as well as being open for ideas and suggestions.

They will also understand circumstances and problems faced by students with entrepreneurial minds and best of all, other students might also be stimulated by the entrepreneurial mindset. By having the mindset, a lecturer will generally be able to pass the upcoming subjects listed below due to the improved teaching methods as well as the approach taken to educate students.

Qualification

For a lecturer teaching a technical subject like accountancy, engineering, biology, chemistry, physics or computer science, a qualification is important as it indicates that he or she possesses sufficient knowledge to conduct a class on the subject.

College entrepreneurs often take up a technical classes or courses because they feel that these subjects can fill up the technical side of their ideas or ventures. Without a qualified lecturer, what they are learning might not be accurate and you wouldn’t want to run a business based on a wrong fundamental concept.

Practical Learning Opportunities for Students

Entrepreneurs love practical learning opportunities. One cannot effectively master certain skills like networking, communication, data mining, research, team work and leadership by just reading.

Group Discussion and Presentation

Group activities, presentations, research reports and mock scenarios help to build the practical skills that are extremely useful for an entrepreneur. However, this may require an extra effort from the lecturers as some syllabuses do not take these activities into account.

Real Life Experience

It is definitely a plus for lecturers to pursue an “off-college” career prior to teaching. Some lecturers start teaching a subject immediately after they completed the same subject itself. These lecturers are unable to provide practical examples which are much needed by college entrepreneurs.

Textbooks often present the bright or imaginary side of reality and it is the insertions of experience excerpts into the lessons that will bring students back to reality. This will help entrepreneurs prepare better before exposing themselves to the real world. Thus, avoid student-turned-lecturers.

Dedication

Entrepreneurs, especially during their teenage years, will ask a lot of detailed questions on the subject they love and this pisses a lot of people, including lecturers of theirs. Being a college entrepreneur has its own advantage because of the availability of lecturers as included in Ten Great Things About Being A College Entrepreneur by David Brim.

Not all lecturers are willing to make their time available to answer your questions that are out of the syllabus. Of course, you will be amazed by the extent of help that some lecturers are willing to offer.

Vibrancy of Class

If a class is boring, most students will start to fall asleep, especially for those who frequently burn the midnight oil. Most teenagers have a short attention span and for college entrepreneurs, falling asleep during a class equals to not being productive. They might as well work on their ideas or ventures.

It is very important for lecturers to keep the class interesting. Ask questions, promote discussions and adopt an interesting teaching method rather than just reading aloud what is just inside the textbook.

Homework

Last but not least, homework and assignments. Assignments kill off the productive time that college entrepreneurs have for their own agendas, especially those that already have their own venture up and running.

I am not saying that lecturers aren’t suppose to give homework but please be moderate. Bear in mind that there are other subjects that a student is taking. Apart from that, we have to do our own revision as well. Even for college entrepreneurs with the best time management skills, tons of assignments will definitely push them against the wall. Yeah, we might outsource it… :mrgreen:

Efforts Must Come from College Entrepreneurs As Well

Even though colleges and lecturers should provide the best learning environment for all students, as an entrepreneur or as an aspiring entrepreneur, we shouldn’t use any of the above as an excuse for not being able to improve ourselves.

Be flexible and learn how to thrive under imperfect circumstances.

To all college entrepreneurs out there, what is the number 1 characteristic that you think every lecturer of yours should possess? What kind of lecturers tick you off?

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Photo credits to Gaetan Lee

{ 20 comments }

edgar January 17, 2009 at 4:24 pm

entrepreneurs are born, not made.

no such thing as lecturers to nurture… if u are one, u are =D no matter what experience ur going through, business is life, when u have a business mindset everything u do u will use ur business brain

if lecturer know how to nurture, theyll be a entrepreneur themself..and they wont be a lecturer.

they are lecturer because they are not entrepreneur, theyre teachers not warriors.

they wont ever understand.

edgar January 18, 2009 at 12:24 am

entrepreneurs are born, not made.

no such thing as lecturers to nurture… if u are one, u are =D no matter what experience ur going through, business is life, when u have a business mindset everything u do u will use ur business brain

if lecturer know how to nurture, theyll be a entrepreneur themself..and they wont be a lecturer.

they are lecturer because they are not entrepreneur, theyre teachers not warriors.

they wont ever understand.

Wayne Liew January 18, 2009 at 2:03 am

Hey Edgar,

Entrepreneurs are not just people that run their own business. Entrepreneurship branches out into intrapreneurship, which is crucial at workplaces that encourage innovation as well as the entrepreneurial spirit.

The mindset is undoubtedly crucial when it comes to entrepreneurship and certain lecturers capabilities will enhance that further. Of course, there will be certain lecturers that entrepreneurs will hate and that’s why I came up with the idea of listing the 7 evaluation subjects above.

I just want to highlight that entrepreneurship is not just about running your own business nor the money, it’s about the mindset, the urge to enhance people’s life and ultimately, to change the world. ;)

Wayne Liew January 18, 2009 at 10:03 am

Hey Edgar,

Entrepreneurs are not just people that run their own business. Entrepreneurship branches out into intrapreneurship, which is crucial at workplaces that encourage innovation as well as the entrepreneurial spirit.

The mindset is undoubtedly crucial when it comes to entrepreneurship and certain lecturers capabilities will enhance that further. Of course, there will be certain lecturers that entrepreneurs will hate and that’s why I came up with the idea of listing the 7 evaluation subjects above.

I just want to highlight that entrepreneurship is not just about running your own business nor the money, it’s about the mindset, the urge to enhance people’s life and ultimately, to change the world. ;)

edgar January 18, 2009 at 2:35 am

lol no. intra is intra

entre is entre.

–noun
1. a person who organizes and manages any enterprise, esp. a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.

intra
–noun
an employee of a large corporation who is given freedom and financial support to create new products, services, systems, etc., and does not have to follow the corporation’s usual routines or protocols.

two different type of people. one is employee, one is boss.

edgar January 18, 2009 at 10:35 am

lol no. intra is intra

entre is entre.

–noun
1. a person who organizes and manages any enterprise, esp. a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.

intra
–noun
an employee of a large corporation who is given freedom and financial support to create new products, services, systems, etc., and does not have to follow the corporation’s usual routines or protocols.

two different type of people. one is employee, one is boss.

edgar January 18, 2009 at 2:37 am

oh well but i get what you mean, lecturers have to try their best to anyway .

Mostly Everyone had to go through college anyway xD

edgar January 18, 2009 at 10:37 am

oh well but i get what you mean, lecturers have to try their best to anyway .

Mostly Everyone had to go through college anyway xD

Jared O'Toole January 23, 2009 at 12:10 am

What about a class that acted as some kind of incubator for your ventures. Homework would revolve around goals you establish and complete. Classes could tackle specific issues that a particular individual is having with their venture.

This would keep everyone involved and class wouldn’t be a waste of time for innovators who know they could be getting things done if they weren’t in class.

Wayne Liew January 23, 2009 at 5:18 am

That would be great but it’s rare. The closest to the characteristics that you have pointed will be MBA or perhaps a B.A. in Entrepreneurship but I doubt both of them allow much room to incorporate your own ventures. I would prefer a self setup mastermind group to achieve that purpose.

Jared O'Toole January 23, 2009 at 8:10 am

What about a class that acted as some kind of incubator for your ventures. Homework would revolve around goals you establish and complete. Classes could tackle specific issues that a particular individual is having with their venture.

This would keep everyone involved and class wouldn’t be a waste of time for innovators who know they could be getting things done if they weren’t in class.

Wayne Liew January 23, 2009 at 1:18 pm

That would be great but it’s rare. The closest to the characteristics that you have pointed will be MBA or perhaps a B.A. in Entrepreneurship but I doubt both of them allow much room to incorporate your own ventures. I would prefer a self setup mastermind group to achieve that purpose.

pizzo February 9, 2009 at 10:01 am

1. (Why did the blogger didn’t acknowledge the correction posted by user Edgar?, a thank you or other reply is considered a good ethic (I read it in this very blogsite), another post I read in this blog, that it’s a sign of a dying blog?)

2. If someone have the interest, they won’t mind it, no matter what level of bore they need to endure. There’s two kinds of people: – Those who think they love it, and – those who like the idea of thinking they love it.

Attitude is everything. So does humility.

3. A student that view homework as counter productive, wanting to get into their own agenda, is a sign of someone who is already good at what they’re doing. “I don’t need this, I got my own thing going you know?” Why bother going through college?

- In a real business, if that happens, the business is heading for doom. A corporation that have each of its component working on their own agendas, is a sign of a company that is not going to make it in their first 5 years.

- Entrepreneurship is about leadership. Good leaders are also good listeners, and good followers. At some point in their life, good entrepreneurs was either a good student or a good worker. It is reason why they can be a good leader, because they are also a good follower and a good listener.

- The college is the boss, students is the employees. Deal with it. But it doesn’t have to be seen that way. It could be:

The college is a client. Students are Independent Business Owners that is providing good quality services, by providing good quality assignments. it’s a business liaison. Do whatever it takes to keep the clients happy.

- One can’t set the priorities of their own agenda higher than the client’s. It does not make sense.

- If someone hope to be their own boss, and have their own ideas, they should do well in their current work, as an employee, work out the basics, tender the resignation and go off on their own or find another opportunity elsewhere. That’s what most successful entrepreneurs have done.

4. If the homework is overbearing, then it means a constraint, it’s a challenge, an external factor that is also an element in economics. In business, there’s things out of the entrepreneur’s control like market prices, economic factors etc. An entrepreneur can’t hope for things outside of their control to go on their favor all the time.

How to best deal with the situation, is entrepreneurial qualities. Time management, task management, is an important aspects to entrepreneurship.

- Although the assignment is expected to be an original product of an individual, No rules ever state, the conducting of research and resources gathering couldn’t be a collaborative effort. Network with other students to trade research sources.

“You, cover the aspects of this, you get into this. blah blah blah.”

Discussing about it, is not the same as photocopying it from someone, as long as someone else is writing it for them. If someone else is doing the work, they must be credited for it.

- Knowledge really is a varied different interpretation of the same subject. Originality? What’s that? Originality is a myth.

Combine the sources and everyone extract what they need according to their personal view on it, and cash out.

Successful entrepreneurs knows for a fact the importance of connectivity and interaction to their business, they also utilize the technology to their advantage. With the advent of mobile connectivity and internet, communication is much simplified. Invest in a skype phone, establish online study groups, a website to pool resources, forum boards, internet video conference. Could save a lot of traveling time and phone bills.

- Creativity what propels innovation. Innovation is what created invention. Invention is often created at the most difficult time.

- Devising a way to complete the assignment faster, in order to have more time to spend on personal things is innovation: it’s the basics of R&D. Acquire extra skills such as speed reading, enhance reading skills, better research method, writing: learning how to put thoughts on writing better, faster, typing faster etc.

There’s a lot of free source software that could help simplify these sort of tasks.

Outsourcing assignments @ cheating? It’s bad business ethics. Later life habit start from somewhere, and most probably in the education system. Successful entrepreneurs (in terms successful, they’re not only judged by how much money they have, it’s how they live their life) constitute and maintain set of morale values. And it is that integrity and values that motivates them, not money a.k.a end result. Successful entrepreneurs value the process as more important than the result.

5. One word: compromise. Why don’t both of the parties choose to sit down and talk about it, open a dialogue, petitions? A good college should have a student body. They’re responsible in that department. An entrepreneur venture need to solve its internal dilemma or they’re heading for a devastating outcome. Negotiation is a practical entrepreneurship skills.

6. For lecturers, there’s a difference in knowing the path than walking it.

To quote robert kiyosaki, in his book, “Poor dad Rich Dad”: when he’s “shopping around” for lawyers and real estate agents, he would first ask them how many real estate that THEY themselves own.

It’s an establishment of confidence, credibility, of them really knowing what they’re talking about, and as Kiyosaki stated, most importantly, they are sharing the same interest.

A consultant isn’t good if they are not personally involved in the business. It signaled their own incompetence, or their own skepticism to the business–they actually are providing advice on things they don’t do or have interest in: “it’s just a job”.

In my personal experience and observation, mainly, people that are good in what they do (because they’re not train to teach, they “do”), are good mentors but lousy teachers (Vice versa for the opposite), they don’t teach things “classroom-style” so to learn from them, one need to pay attention, know when to take notes, and when to “ask”.

Wayne Liew February 10, 2009 at 11:23 pm

Pizzo, you have pointed out some great tip for the audience of this blog but let me address a couple of issues that you have stated.

Edgar is a close friend (a classmate actually). In the third comment of his above, he states that he got my meaning in my reply to his first comment. I have also followed up with him personally. :) Also, this blog is definitely not dying :p . I have been studying for a test. The upcoming blog post will be posted on this Wednesday, stay tuned. ;)

On your point on homework, entrepreneurs must be a good listener and follower to become a good leader, which is true, but homework is not the only necessary way for us to learn how to listen and follow. I like your example on how to see things differently but if you have a venture going on and the homework is going to add 10 more lines to your to-do list, I don’t know about you but I will be frustrated or even mad because I could have spend the time on building my own business. :mrgreen:

P/S: Most parents, especially Asian parents, REQUIRE their children to go to college, yes, even if they are already running a business at a young age.

Again, I would like to highlight that you have provided some great tips on how entrepreneurs or entrepreneurial students can study better and be more productive. Thanks.

pizzo February 9, 2009 at 6:01 pm

1. (Why did the blogger didn’t acknowledge the correction posted by user Edgar?, a thank you or other reply is considered a good ethic (I read it in this very blogsite), another post I read in this blog, that it’s a sign of a dying blog?)

2. If someone have the interest, they won’t mind it, no matter what level of bore they need to endure. There’s two kinds of people: – Those who think they love it, and – those who like the idea of thinking they love it.

Attitude is everything. So does humility.

3. A student that view homework as counter productive, wanting to get into their own agenda, is a sign of someone who is already good at what they’re doing. “I don’t need this, I got my own thing going you know?” Why bother going through college?

- In a real business, if that happens, the business is heading for doom. A corporation that have each of its component working on their own agendas, is a sign of a company that is not going to make it in their first 5 years.

- Entrepreneurship is about leadership. Good leaders are also good listeners, and good followers. At some point in their life, good entrepreneurs was either a good student or a good worker. It is reason why they can be a good leader, because they are also a good follower and a good listener.

- The college is the boss, students is the employees. Deal with it. But it doesn’t have to be seen that way. It could be:

The college is a client. Students are Independent Business Owners that is providing good quality services, by providing good quality assignments. it’s a business liaison. Do whatever it takes to keep the clients happy.

- One can’t set the priorities of their own agenda higher than the client’s. It does not make sense.

- If someone hope to be their own boss, and have their own ideas, they should do well in their current work, as an employee, work out the basics, tender the resignation and go off on their own or find another opportunity elsewhere. That’s what most successful entrepreneurs have done.

4. If the homework is overbearing, then it means a constraint, it’s a challenge, an external factor that is also an element in economics. In business, there’s things out of the entrepreneur’s control like market prices, economic factors etc. An entrepreneur can’t hope for things outside of their control to go on their favor all the time.

How to best deal with the situation, is entrepreneurial qualities. Time management, task management, is an important aspects to entrepreneurship.

- Although the assignment is expected to be an original product of an individual, No rules ever state, the conducting of research and resources gathering couldn’t be a collaborative effort. Network with other students to trade research sources.

“You, cover the aspects of this, you get into this. blah blah blah.”

Discussing about it, is not the same as photocopying it from someone, as long as someone else is writing it for them. If someone else is doing the work, they must be credited for it.

- Knowledge really is a varied different interpretation of the same subject. Originality? What’s that? Originality is a myth.

Combine the sources and everyone extract what they need according to their personal view on it, and cash out.

Successful entrepreneurs knows for a fact the importance of connectivity and interaction to their business, they also utilize the technology to their advantage. With the advent of mobile connectivity and internet, communication is much simplified. Invest in a skype phone, establish online study groups, a website to pool resources, forum boards, internet video conference. Could save a lot of traveling time and phone bills.

- Creativity what propels innovation. Innovation is what created invention. Invention is often created at the most difficult time.

- Devising a way to complete the assignment faster, in order to have more time to spend on personal things is innovation: it’s the basics of R&D. Acquire extra skills such as speed reading, enhance reading skills, better research method, writing: learning how to put thoughts on writing better, faster, typing faster etc.

There’s a lot of free source software that could help simplify these sort of tasks.

Outsourcing assignments @ cheating? It’s bad business ethics. Later life habit start from somewhere, and most probably in the education system. Successful entrepreneurs (in terms successful, they’re not only judged by how much money they have, it’s how they live their life) constitute and maintain set of morale values. And it is that integrity and values that motivates them, not money a.k.a end result. Successful entrepreneurs value the process as more important than the result.

5. One word: compromise. Why don’t both of the parties choose to sit down and talk about it, open a dialogue, petitions? A good college should have a student body. They’re responsible in that department. An entrepreneur venture need to solve its internal dilemma or they’re heading for a devastating outcome. Negotiation is a practical entrepreneurship skills.

6. For lecturers, there’s a difference in knowing the path than walking it.

To quote robert kiyosaki, in his book, “Poor dad Rich Dad”: when he’s “shopping around” for lawyers and real estate agents, he would first ask them how many real estate that THEY themselves own.

It’s an establishment of confidence, credibility, of them really knowing what they’re talking about, and as Kiyosaki stated, most importantly, they are sharing the same interest.

A consultant isn’t good if they are not personally involved in the business. It signaled their own incompetence, or their own skepticism to the business–they actually are providing advice on things they don’t do or have interest in: “it’s just a job”.

In my personal experience and observation, mainly, people that are good in what they do (because they’re not train to teach, they “do”), are good mentors but lousy teachers (Vice versa for the opposite), they don’t teach things “classroom-style” so to learn from them, one need to pay attention, know when to take notes, and when to “ask”.

Wayne Liew February 11, 2009 at 7:23 am

Pizzo, you have pointed out some great tip for the audience of this blog but let me address a couple of issues that you have stated.

Edgar is a close friend (a classmate actually). In the third comment of his above, he states that he got my meaning in my reply to his first comment. I have also followed up with him personally. :) Also, this blog is definitely not dying :p . I have been studying for a test. The upcoming blog post will be posted on this Wednesday, stay tuned. ;)

On your point on homework, entrepreneurs must be a good listener and follower to become a good leader, which is true, but homework is not the only necessary way for us to learn how to listen and follow. I like your example on how to see things differently but if you have a venture going on and the homework is going to add 10 more lines to your to-do list, I don’t know about you but I will be frustrated or even mad because I could have spend the time on building my own business. :mrgreen:

P/S: Most parents, especially Asian parents, REQUIRE their children to go to college, yes, even if they are already running a business at a young age.

Again, I would like to highlight that you have provided some great tips on how entrepreneurs or entrepreneurial students can study better and be more productive. Thanks.

Gerald February 13, 2009 at 5:44 am

It’s a fact that textbooks can present an imaginary side of the truth, but the lessons involved in college, trade school or business school can offer the dynamics and academics necessary to learn the fundamenttals of entrepreneurship, even if the experience aspect goes unfulfilled. You can find out more info at: http://www.24conference.com

Textbooks often present the bright or imaginary side of reality and it is the insertions of experience excerpts into the lessons that will bring students back to reality. This will help entrepreneurs prepare better before exposing themselves to the real world. Thus, avoid student-turned-lecturers.

Wayne Liew February 14, 2009 at 12:25 am

I think the insertions, as you have mentioned is very important but sadly, this is not the case for most colleges nowadays.

Gerald February 13, 2009 at 1:44 pm

It’s a fact that textbooks can present an imaginary side of the truth, but the lessons involved in college, trade school or business school can offer the dynamics and academics necessary to learn the fundamenttals of entrepreneurship, even if the experience aspect goes unfulfilled. You can find out more info at: http://www.24conference.com

Textbooks often present the bright or imaginary side of reality and it is the insertions of experience excerpts into the lessons that will bring students back to reality. This will help entrepreneurs prepare better before exposing themselves to the real world. Thus, avoid student-turned-lecturers.

Wayne Liew February 14, 2009 at 8:25 am

I think the insertions, as you have mentioned is very important but sadly, this is not the case for most colleges nowadays.

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